The Art of A Card

I am not sure when it started, but ever since I could remember, my grandmother and I mailed handwritten letters to each other at least once a week. She always wrote on pink stationery, the beautiful cursive in neat lines with a ballpoint pen. It didn’t matter that we just saw each other that week, we would always have something to say.

My grandfather’s Christmas card from the 1980’s.

My grandfather, her husband, hand drew his holiday cards every year. Before you could send the image online to a stationery company and get it delivered instantly to your door, he would draw it to size on a sturdy piece of paper, drawing exactly where he wanted it cut. If there was any color, he would lay a plastic laminate sheet over it, so that when it you put it on top of the work, it would show exactly what areas would be colored.

The combination of their love of writing and drawing was instilled in me from the beginning, subtly showing me just how important it was to always send something handwritten as not only a token of appreciation for a gift, but as a way of expressing your personality.

My mother would always make sure I wrote thank you notes when friends or family sent gifts, and eventually not having to even mention it because it was an automatic part of my routine.

Even when email became popular, and my grandmother started using it at age 92, we still wrote letters because it was easier for her to handwrite in cursive than spend an hour writing two sentences.

Recently, someone sent me an article from the New York Times about the art of sending a greeting card, and how almost 81% of people conducted in a survey preferred a handwritten note or card.

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One of my favorite cards to give to your wine-loving partner. Shop here.

This is why I love designing and selling cards in my shop. Sometimes you
don’t have the right words to convey your message, and when you find that card that does, it’s like a light bulb goes off in your head. You just know the
recipient will genuinely feel a sense of gratitude that someone took the time
to buy, handwrite, AND mail a card.

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Who wants an “ordinary” birthday when you have a CATASTIC Birthday?! Click here to shop.

So the next time a happy (or sad) occasion happens, and you whip out your
phone to text or email, pause, and head to Etsy, your local stationery
store, or somewhere like Target and I promise you that perfect card will have much more of an impact.

 

Lindsay is the owner of Sacco Studios, a pawsitively awesome shop for dog and cat lovers. You can find her work here.

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